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Park Royal Vehicles


Early 1950's Publicity Material
Part 2
Models for the British Market


 
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Early 1950's Publicity Material
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Park Royal Vehicles Ltd.

This is Part 2 of a series of 4 articles featuring publicity material published by Park Royal Vehicles Ltd. in the early 1950's. You will find links to the other parts of this series in the green column on the left.

Park Royal Vehicles Ltd. was a coachbuilding company in north-west London, having close links with London's buses for many years. The company ceased operating in 1980, but one of its most famous products, the Routemaster bus, built in collaboration with its parent company AEC, is still a common sight on the roads of central London.

All the pictures below are clickable to see a larger version if wished. The pictures appear in pairs, a colour exterior view, and a black and white interior view. The text accompanying the pictures is that which appeared in the original Park Royal publicity material.

I will just add a short comment about the first picture which shows a London Transport RT bus (AEC Regent Mk.III) on route 140. The final phase of my bus driving career was spent at Harrow Weald garage in north-west London from 1977 until 1979. It was in 1978 that I last drove an RT and that was on route 140 which Harrow Weald garage operated. At the time, it was one of London's longest bus routes, the full journey running between Heathrow Airport and Mill Hill. Today, because of the worsening traffic congestion, like many other of the longer bus routes in London, it has been chopped up into shorter, more manageable sections. In the summer of 1978, the Park Royal bodied RT's on route 140 were replaced with another AEC/Park Royal product, the Routemaster bus.



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A 56-seater metal-framed double-deck bus in London's famous colours. Designed for large-quantity production, this Park Royal body is mounted on an AEC RT chassis. The lower saloon of a double-deck London bus. The seat design effectively increases the gangway width.
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A 36-seater metal semi-coach body constructed integrally with the AEC Regal Mark IV chassis. The wide windscreen affords the driver an excellent vision. Toning with the exterior colour scheme, the passenger seats are trimmed in a pale-blue figured moquette. Note the recessed lighting beneath the parcel racks.
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Operated in the Isle of Man by Douglas Corporation Transport Department. A Park Royal 29-seater body of composite construction mounted on a Leyland 'Comet' chassis. This interior view of the 29-seater bus shows the vertical emergency exit door position at the rear.
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Clean and pleasing modern lines are well illustrated by this view of a 38-seater Park Royal bus body, integrally built with AEC underfloor-engined chassis. The clean exterior appearance of this underfloor-engined bus is matched by the interior finish. The service-type bus seats are sensibly yet attractively trimmed in hide and corded repp.
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Seating 56 passengers, a double-deck bus with Park Royal metal body 27 ft. in overall length and 8 ft. wide. A saloon heater unit is mounted in a concealed position beneath the canopy. The chassis is an AEC Regent Mark III. The upper saloon of the bus for Morecambe and Heysham, Lancashire. The wide gangway between the seats and their exceptionally smart trimming are well shown in this illustration.
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Seating 56 passengers, this trolley bus is one of a fleet operated by the county town of Ipswich, England. The Park Royal metal body is mounted on a Sunbeam chassis. This view of the upper saloon of an Ipswich troley bus with Park Royal body shows the hard-wearing seats trimmed in hide.
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Of composite construction, this 56-seater double-deck bus body is operated by Leeds City Transport Department and built by our subsidiary company, Charles H. Roe Limited of Crossgates, Leeds. The chassis is the AEC Regent Mark III. The lower saloon of a double-deck bus for operation in Leeds. The opening windows are of the 'top-sliding' type.
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A 56-seater double-deck body of metal construction built by our Associated Company in Scotland, J. Brockhouse & Company Limited of Clydebank, Glasgow. Mounted upon an Albion chassis the vehicle is operated by the Glasgow Corporation Transport. For Glasgow: a view of the upper saloon looking towards the rear.
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Completed under licence, this 56-seater is operated by Newport Corporation Transport. Mounted upon a Guy chassis, the Park Royal metal structure is finished by Guy Motors Limited at Wolverhampton. A double-deck metal-framed bus body for Newport Corporation Transport. An interior view of the lower saloon.


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This page was last updated on: 15 April 2004