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Park Royal Vehicles


Part 1
Early 1950's Publicity Material
Export Models


 
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Park Royal Vehicles
Part 2
Early 1950's Publicity Material
British Models

Park Royal Vehicles
Part 3
Early 1950's Publicity Material
More Export Models

Park Royal Vehicles
Part 4
Early 1950's Publicity Material
Views of the Abbey Road Works

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Graham Hill's Web Site

British Buses of the 1960's




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Park Royal Vehicles Ltd.

Park Royal Vehicles Ltd. is the coachbuilder people think of first when they think of London's buses. Even though the factory ceased production in 1980, its products are still a common site on London's roads in the form of the famous Routemaster buses, most of which were built between 1959 and 1968. You can read more on Park Royal Vehicles at Graham Hill's Web Site, who is the son of the designer of the Routemaster bus, Alfred Hill, and at British Buses of the 1960's website.

Continuing on the theme of bus industry advertising, I have now acquired a quantity of publicity material produced by Park Royal Vehicles in the early 1950's ( with many thanks to Jørn Malde). I will be publishing this over the coming months. First out are some photographs and artwork depicting 5 motorbuses and one trolleybus which were built for the export market. The pictures appear in pairs, a colour picture of the bus accompanied by a black and white interior view. All the pictures are clickable to see a larger version. The text accompanying the pictures is Park Royal's.



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A 67-passenger city-service bus designed for Continental demonstration. This Park Royal body is built integrally with the AEC Regal Mark IV underfloor-engined chassis. The Continental demonstrator, specially designed to give ample standing accommodation.
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A 57-seater single-deck bus body of metal construction mounted on an Albion chassis. Under West African conditions the open doorways are required for adequate ventilation. The deep louvres over the windows permit their being opened for ventilation even during tropical rainstorms. The bench-type seats are a requirement of the Nigerian operator.
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Designed for luxury sightseeing tours, this wireless-equipped metal-framed coach with Park Royal bodywork and Albion chassis is one of a fleet for Durban, South Africa. Luxurious seating for 37 passengers, sunken gangway, sliding roof, and cantilever parcel racks are features of this coach for Durban.
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With seperate passenger entrance and exit doorways this 37-seater is operating in Greece. The metal city-service type body is mounted on the AEC Regal Mark III chassis. An interior view, looking rearward, of the bus built for Davos and Doucas, Greece.
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A 42-seater operating in Rio de Janeiro. One of a fleet of Park Royal city-service type metal buses built on the Sentinel underfloor-engined chassis. Polished moulding enhances the fine lines of this vehicle. In this bus built for Brazil the entire body is insulated against extremes of temperature. Windows which lower to waist level, sunblinds, and a system of forced ventilation are features incorporated in the design.
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A 38-seater single-deck trolley bus with Park Royal metal body mounted on Ransomes, Simms and Jeffries chassis. It is one of a fleet operated in Trinidad, British West Indies, by the Port of Spain Electricity Board. Interior view of a single-deck, metal-framed trolley bus for the Port of Spain Electricity Board, Trinidad.


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This page was last updated on: 15 April 2004