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1955 British
Road Transport Industry Advertising
Part 1

     
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1955 British Bus
Industry Advertising
Part 1

1955 British Bus
Industry Advertising
Part 2

1955 British Bus
Industry Advertising
Part 3



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Following on from the 3 previous 1950's British bus industry advertising features, part 4 is more generalised as it covers road transport industry advertising. Many of the advertisements could apply just as much to he bus industry as they could to the road haulage industry though.

What these advertisements have in common with those shown previously is their ability to invoke the period through their artwork, and in some cases through their texts and the products themselves.

Click on a picture to view a full-size version.



Avon Tyres were one of the best known tyre makers of the period. Click for a full-size picture
Click for a full-size picture I don't know if they've become any more durable now, but the leaves in leaf springs would have to be checked almost as often as you dipped the oil sump. Hit a large pot-hole with a heavy load and you could be almost guaranteed a cracked leaf.
Despite the developments in glass reinforced resins and plastics, there are still many applications where metal is irreplaceable. Many such companies still thrive today. Click for a full-size picture
Click for a full-size picture CAV were one of the biggest names in diesel injection pumps. They later merged with the automotive electrical component manufacturer, Lucas. I believe they are still in existence today.
Docker Brothers at Ladywood, Birmingham, are manufacturers of paints, lacquers and varnishes to the transport industry and as far as I know are still in business. The artwork in this advertisement is so very typically 1950's. Two more old advertisements from this manufacturer can be seen at Ladywood Past and Present website. Click for a full-size picture
Click for a full-size picture Guy Motors Ltd. of Wolverhampton produced commercial vehicles from 1914 to 1978. Motor buses and trolleybuses had been a significant part of their output, the "Arab" series of motor buses being perhaps the best known. Many of the World War II utility buses were built on Guy Arab chassis. This advertisement features their extensive mid-1950's range of trucks.
Hardy Spicer, manufacturer of transmissions, was incorporated in 1949 in Burwood, Victoria, Australia. In the 1950's they became part of the Repco Group. Later the company became part of various British/Japanese groups, until April 2002 when it once again became a wholly owned Australian company. The advertisement featuring veteran and contemporary Scammell trucks dates from the period with Repco in the mid-1950's. Click for a full-size picture
Click for a full-size picture Don't be misled by the koala, this is no Australian company but a once mighty Bradford, England based textile company which went out of business in 1997. They produced all sorts of fabrics, including seat coverings for buses etc.. Again, the artwork is very typical of the 1950's. When I first saw this advertisement I had a feeling of déjà vouz. I seemed to remember a London Transport poster featuring a very similar koala. It's not in Oliver Green's "Underground Art". Any suggestions?
Nulac was a product of Robert Kearsley & Co. of Ripon, Yorkshire, England. They were another producer of transport finishes and even at the time of publication of this advertisement were a very long established company. How long they survived after the 1950's, I haven't been able to find out. Click for a full-size picture
Click for a full-size picture Specialloid were piston manufacturers. They were much used in post-war Vincent motorcycles, although they were not limited to these as the advertisement suggests. What has happened to the company, I do not know. The last references I have found were in a document dated 2001 issued by the Financial Services Authority (a UK government organ) concerning its pension plan.
The company name "C.C. Wakefield & Co. Ltd." on the reply coupon is the company which today is known as Castrol Limited, manufacturer of the famous Castrol Motor Oil. The similarity in the logo on the advertisement with the "Castrol" logo is clear. The founder of the company was one Charles Cheers Wakefield. I don't know where the "Dick" part came from. Click for a full-size picture
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This page was last updated on: 29 December 2005