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1955 British
Bus Industry Advertising
Part 2

     
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1955 British Bus
Industry Advertising
Part 1

1955 British Bus
Industry Advertising
Part 3

1955 British Road
Transport Industry Advertising
Part 1



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Here is part 2 of the 1955 bus industry advertising feature, with 11 more advertisements to take you back in time to the second 'Golden Age' of road passenger transport (the first and greatest 'Golden Age' was in the 1930's !).

Click on a picture to view a full-size version.



Beckett, Laycock & Watkinson, manufacturers of windows for buses and coaches. The factory was in Acton, west London. Strachans coachbuilders, one of their customers, was right round the corner, and Park Royal Vehicles was also in the same area. The Duple factory wasn't so very far away either in north-west London. Click for a full-size picture
Click for a full-size picture British Insulated Callender's Cables Ltd. (BICC) produced trolley wires amongst other types of cable. I remember as a child, sitting in the Lyons Teahouse with my brother, sister and mother, above the Lyons Bakery in Wembley High Road, north-west London, which was on the 662 trolleybus route. Looking out of the window, we would be at the same level as the trolley wires. Our eyes would be fixed on these, waiting for the slightest movement, in order to be the first to predict the imminent approach of a trolleybus. It didn't take much to keep us kids entertained !
For many, Burlingham coachbodies were the epitomy of a British 1950's luxury-coach body. I drove a Burlingham bodied Bedford in 1974, but then it was considered an old heap! It had a 'Chinese' gearbox, where 3rd and 4th gears were placed side-by-side at the top of the 'H' instead of one being up, and the other being down on the 'H'. Click for a full-size picture
Click for a full-size picture Commer Avenger. Commers are what I associate with the buses local authorities used for school and social-services transport in the 50's and 60's. A few did crop up on bus services over here in Norway.
The Dawson bus-wash. This looks very much like the machines in use in London Transport bus garages in the 1970's. The front and the back of the buses would have to be washed by hand before the bus went through the machine. And that top 'brush' ? That just hung like a limp rag. I think low hanging tree-branches did a better job of cleaning the roofs. Click for a full-size picture
Click for a full-size picture £2,575 for a new Bedford/Duple bus. You wouldn't be able to insure it for that now ! This is not a model that I remember. It looks like another candidate for social-services transport.
Park Royal Vehicles. This factory was closely associated with London's buses. At the time of this advertisement they were 'between jobs'. Production of bodies for London's RTs had stopped in 1953, and RM production would not get into full swing until 1958/9. The AEC vehicle factory for which they built so many bodies, was situated just a little further west in London at Southall. Click for a full-size picture
Click for a full-size picture I haven't had much contact with Roe bodies. The exception was when I was living in Towcester, Northamptonshire. There were many shopping trips into Northampton, where the red and cream Corporation buses livened up the town's streets. The bulk of these buses were Roe bodied Daimler CVG6's.
Here's another one for ticket-machine enthusiasts. I remember seeing them in use, but for the life of me, I can't remember where ! The dials reminded me of telephone dials. I think these were very quiet machines, unlike the Gibsons used in London. Oh, by the way, nice hat !

Joyce Whitchurch at the Sheffield Bus Museum wrote, "Just thought you would like to know that TIM machines were standard issue at Wigan Corporation Transport during the 1960's and, if memory serves, until well after absorption into Greater Manchester PTE (i.e. beyond 1976).
Click for a full-size picture
Click for a full-size picture The Anti-Attrition Metal Co. Ltd. They produced low friction metals, which were essential for the pick-ups on trolley-heads. If you're a model maker thinking of making a trolley-bus, here you have a picture of a trolley-head to work from. You never know, someone might need it.
Here's a company that made the covering which was wound round the grab-poles on buses. Usually it was found on the poles in the platform area of open platformed buses. Did you ever run your thumbnail down them to make that zipping noise ? Click for a full-size picture


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This page was last updated on: 23 November 2003